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Among these, the Seto kiln in Owari Province (present day Aichi Prefecture) had a glaze technique.According to legend, Katō Shirozaemon Kagemasa (also known as Tōshirō) studied ceramic techniques in China and brought high-fired glazed ceramic to Seto in 1223.A third tradition, of simple but perfectly formed and glazed stonewares, also relates more closely to both Chinese and Korean traditions.In the 16th century, a number of styles of traditional utilitarian rustic wares then in production became admired for their simplicity, and their forms have often been kept in production to the present day for a collectors market. 11th millennium BC), the earliest soft earthenware was made.On the one hand, there is a tradition of very simple and roughly finished pottery, mostly in earthenware and using a muted palette of earth colours.This relates to Zen Buddhism and many of the greatest masters were priests, especially in early periods.In the 20th century, a modern ceramics industry (e.g., Noritake and Toto Ltd.) grew up.

The anagama kiln could produce stoneware, Sue pottery, fired at high temperatures of over 1200–1300˚C, sometimes embellished with accidents produced when introducing plant material to the kiln during the reduced-oxygen phase of firing.Japan has an exceptionally long and successful history of ceramic production.Earthenwares were created as early as the Jōmon period (10,000–300 BCE), giving Japan one of the oldest ceramic traditions in the world.Until the 17th century, unglazed stoneware was popular for the heavy-duty daily requirements of a largely agrarian society; funerary jars, storage jars, and a variety of kitchen pots typify the bulk of the production.Some of the kilns improved their technology and are called the "Six Old Kilns": Shigaraki (Shigaraki ware), Tamba, Bizen, Tokoname, Echizen, and Seto.

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