Error validating server certificate for tortoisesvn

For that, you should devise some other mechanism of distinguishing releases, such as using tags.The question is a bit loaded, because everyone seems to have a slightly different definition of "changeset", or a least a slightly different expectation of what it means for a version control system to have "changeset features".Most other projects probably would have called the product "1.0" much earlier, but we deliberately decided to delay that label as long as possible. Such limitations are always documented in the release notes of our releases.We were aware that many people were waiting for a 1.0 before using Subversion, and had very specific expectations about the meaning of that label. The client and server are designed to work as long as they aren't more than one major release version apart. Our client/server interoperability policy is documented in the "Compatibility" section of the Subversion Community Guide.Copyright © 2017 The Apache Software Foundation, Licensed under the Apache License, Version 2.0.Apache, Apache Subversion, and the Apache feather logo are trademarks of The Apache Software Foundation.Subversion and the Apache Subversion logo are registered trademarks of The Apache Software Foundation. Several companies (Collab Net, WANdisco, Visual SVN, elego, ...) pay or have payed the salaries of some full-time developers, but the software carries an Apache License which is fully compliant with the Debian Free Software Guidelines.In other words, you are free to download, modify, and redistribute Subversion as you please; no permission from any company or any person is required. It is mature software, with strong compatibility guarantees.

However, colloquially, a revision number is used to refer to the change committed in that revision; for example, "the change in r588" ("r588" is shorthand for "revision 588") really means "the difference between repository trees 587 and 588", or put another way, "the change made to tree 587 to produce tree 588".

svnserve speaks a custom protocol, while mod_dav_svn uses Web DAV as its network protocol.

See chapter 6 in the Subversion book to learn more. The long answer: if you just want to access a repository, then you only need to build a Subversion client.

The repository just stores a versioned directory tree — you may consider certain sub-trees to be projects, but Subversion doesn't treat them differently from any other sub-tree.

Thus, the interpretation of what constitutes a project in the repository is left entirely up to the users.

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