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On this trip, his fans will witness Schlappig's latest mission: a weekend jaunt that will slingshoot him across East Asia — Hong Kong, Jakarta, Tokyo — and back to New York, in 69 hours.

He'll rarely leave the airports, and when he does he'll rest his head only in luxury hotels. Schlappig, 25, is one of the biggest stars among an elite group of obsessive flyers whose mission is to outwit the airlines.

Born in New York, he became obsessed with airplanes as a small child, endlessly reciting aircraft models and issuing flight announcements from the back of his parents' car.

"Benjamin was always different than my two other boys," says his mom, Barbara.

As he delved deeper, Schlappig learned about a third level, a closely guarded practice called Manufacture Spend, where Hobbyists harness the power of the multitudes of credit cards in their pockets.

Airline-affiliated credit cards award points for every dollar spent, so over the decades, Hobbyists manipulated the system by putting purchases on credit cards without ultimately spending anything at all.

At its simplest, this included purchasing dollar coins from the U. Mint with a credit card and immediately using them to pay off the charge.

In the past 20 years, the Internet has drawn together this strange band of savants with an odd mix of skills: the digital talent of a code writer, a lawyer's love affair with fine print, and a passion for airline bureaucracy.

Hong Kong, he says, is his favorite hub, and "the only city I could ever live in." The 16-hour trip has become so routine that it's begun to feel like a pajama-clad blur of champagne and caviar — or, in Schlappig's terminology, a "two-hangover flight."As the sun descends over the polar circle, a recumbent Schlappig loses himself in a marathon playing on a free-standing flatscreen.

"The fact is, we are beating the airlines at their own game," he said last year at a gathering of the Hobby's top talent.

The six suites in this leather-bound playpen of faux mahogany and fresh-cut flowers comprise the inner sanctum of commercial flight that few ever witness. " exclaims one, and soon Schlappig is ordering champagne for everyone.

They're mostly empty now, save for two men in their twenties who seem even giddier than the flight attendants. This sort of thing happens to Schlappig nearly everywhere he goes.

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